//
you're reading...
Artist Interviews

Wale Interview (part 3): Discusses Self Made, Ambition


Audio:

Culture VI: Rick Ross has a very specific formula that he follows. It’s really reminiscent of 50 Cent. When he did his album, he just kind of regurgitated the same type of sound until everybody was tired. I’m not a Rick Ross fan, but I liked his album. I listened to Self Made, and I’m already getting tired of the sound. And then I hear someone like you, who is very creative, and I start to wonder is this going to stifle your creativity, when people are already criticizing you for not showing growth.

Wale: It’s a slight possibility that we put an album together for the people that  appreciate the summer. It’s a slight possibility that we kept all the ideas for the albums, like the reaaaaal stuff. Maybe. I don’t think we’re going to sit around with like Steven Spielberg, Hype Williams, Spike Lee and everyone else to create this big movie compilation for the people. We gave them records this summer! I don’t hear no complaints from Flex, Envy, none of them. But I understand your concern, and I appreciate it, as a somewhat of a fan. But, you got to understand who you’re dealing with. My first record, the first verse on there was only 8 bars! That wasn’t no profound shit! ‘Name Wale, they probably know me from the Roc” What the fuck man?!  “Shake it, shake it, shake it offff”. That might sound crazy to everyone else, but everybody in DC, they’re going to know that for the rest of their life. So how you going to say ‘Oh, I’m doing a song Malcolm X, and I’m not providing anything for the people’? You talking about somebody who made a song called “Rhyme of the Century”, wrote it when I was like 19 years old, and wanted that to be my biggest record, first song ever! Right? I’m the same person! Listen to Malcolm X. I got a lot of Muslim family members and friends. There’s a lot of gems in that verse. If you can look over the fact I’m rhyming on a quote-unquote “Lex Lugar-sounding beat”, or rhyming with two ex-drug dealers. If you can look past that and listen to the verse…you MIGHT hear something, just maybe. If you know into anybody who’s into sneakers and collects sneakers, you MIGHT understand all the jargon I’m talking about in “Fitted Cap”. And I sound very narcissistic right now, like I’m talking down, but that’s not it. I’m going to defend my music. That’s why I take so long to write some of them verses, so I can defend them. Now why don’t you read–somebody got my lyrics up for “By Any Means” – READ IT! You can google it, then read it! And then go ask anybody who know the Qu’ran, and who is appreciative of the faith how they feel about that. Because I touched a lot of with that who never really knew. There’s beauty in that, my nigga, like for real. Really. There’s beauty in that 14 year old kid who slept outside to get them new Jordans, but you ain’t heard me talk about them sneakers in two years. There’s beauty in that. There’s beauty in a lot of motherfuckers that cried, begged, screamed, kicked down the door to hear Wale on a Just Blaze record right? I gave that initially. And the first verse was for you, fortunately. “They tried to tell me I don’t fit up in this mothafucka/ Cause Rozay be talkin’ white, he think he Uncle Ruckus”. Well that might be the case. I can get a Just Blaze beat on my solo album now because of that! That means something to me! “Running Rebels”…that’s hip-hop right there. That’s the same producer that was on my first mixtape who made that beat! Did he change too? Did he do anything different? Nah, that ain’t gonna say that. If I would of put that joint—if I would have made a mixtape 200 Miles Runnin and put that song on there, and put By Any Means verse and rapped it on something with a sample that I probably could never clear, ‘Oh yea, Wale so hip hop. Yea’. These quote-unquote “hip-hop enthusiasts’ don’t—they getting the game fucked up now. Everybody’s an A&R.. for the world’s record label. And they signing everybody. Youtube niggas, everybody, everything. You not listening. You stopped listening! You used to listen, you stopped. You know why you stopped? Because you became an A&R like everybody else. They stopped listening, they started—. Now everybody sizing up. Nobody want to get in the motherfucking game, but everyone wants to call the fucking plays now. Ya’ll stop listening. The niggas that’s listening is Clark Kent, who called me, say “Man, my nigga, you killed that”. Young Guru to call me. For Fab to say “Man, you killin that shit”. They ain’t stop listening. It’s the niggas with the computers, that sit down there and analyze everything. If you go out and see the world and enjoy the club, and see some women and see some things and read some things, and stop looking at the fact that I’m rhyming over something that might sound like something you heard before and listen to the words, like hip hop used to be…niggas might see something.

Culture VI: That’s actually a very fair point. I agree 100 percent when it comes to that. Me personally, I’m 34 years old, when I go out—

Wale: OHHHH! So there you have it! I’m 27, you’re 34 right? So where does that leave us?

Culture VI: Nah, but see, that’s different. I’m not criticizing for something not sounding like it came out of 1994. When I’m out, I listen to the Rick Ross records in the club. Or when I’m with my wife on Friday night–

Wale: What club you in?! What club you went to? What club did you go to? I’m serious, with all due respect. Because in 8 years, when I’m there, chances are I’m not trying to hear nothing geechy niggas is talking about no more, for real. So what club you went in that you got an opportunity to analyze whether or not if you liked how a Rick Ross record felt?

Culture VI: I don’t listen to Rick Ross in my IPod. I listen to Rick Ross when I’m out, when I’m having drinks. I listen to probably half the records on Maybach Music when I’m out

Wale: I’m just going to tell you, because I know you’re an intellectual dude, but you’re showing signs of weakness because you contradicted yourself. I don’t want to tell you where, because when the—you can play it back, and you just did it like 3 times. I respect you enough to tell you that. Because if I didn’t I’d just wait until you got off and just tore you a new one. But I’m not even going to mention it. Now or then. So now back to the ole ‘you heard the album’ while out. Heard half of the album while you were out. It’s about 14 songs on there. Last time I checked, we didn’t have 7 singles. But…I think you might be a closet Maybach fan, so we all good.

Culture VI: I told you, I listen to the records. I wouldn’t put it in my IPod—

Wale: But you just told me you heard it when you was out! We don’t have 7 singles out! You heard all 14 records while out? Wherever club you was at, they played all 14 Maybach records? Who the DJ? Ross probably need to sign that nigga. You heard the whole album.

Culture VI: No, I listen to any new album that people are talking about that has something that interests me. I’ll listen to anything and give it a fair chance. Of course I would, why wouldn’t I? I talk music all day.

Wale: And I appreciate. If you actually sitting back and taking an honest look into the music, I respect that. But if you’re being like a lot of these people that all of the sudden are A&Rs, they probably work at Safeway, or go to school or could be a doctor, a lawyer whatever, but they (want to be) A&Rs on the internet? I can’t respect that. You got to go out and touch the people, you got to go out where we at. By all means, I am not no street nigga. I don’t try to be no street nigga, I don’t want to be no street nigga. I’m a regular nigga, born in D.C., grew up in the suburbs of Maryland. Around a WHOLE lot of ignorant niggas though. So I understand. I understand. My best friend been locked up for 6 years. I know! You know what I’m saying? So before niggas go into that “Blahblahblah, what is he doing?” Nigga! First of all, I always rapped about bitches! And I rapped about women. So, we can throw all that “Blahblahblahblah, he’s rapping–” Nah, that was always the case. I’ve always had subject matter. There’s always subject. It’s all over the album if you listen to it. Maybe you should read the lyrics then. Maybe it’s not for you, but the words is there. If you read it, you’d feel it.

Culture VI: My thing is, I’m listening to some of the Self Made songs, and unless I’m out somewhere, it wasn’t hitting me like that. When that happens, you stop paying attention to the lyrics. Because a song is more than lyrics, it’s the whole package. And that’s what I think that Wale fans are afraid of, that you’re going to lose some of the creativity and—

Wale: But…according to you, my first album wasn’t GOOD, so it’s not much to lose is my point. You can’t be the same person telling me I made a mediocre first album and telling me I’m going to lose my creativity. Something wasn’t there from the jump! In your eyes. So all it is right now for you to do is get your popcorn, get your seat, get your yellow Nuvo, you know what I’m saying? And sit down and be like “Ambition on the motherfucking way, let’s see what he do”.

Culture VI: Well, like I did with Attention Deficit and like I did with Self Made, I am going to buy the album, I am going to take a good, honest listen to it. I am going to root for a good album, because I want what every other hip hop fan wants. We just want more good music.

Wale: But guess what though? The whole point of this interview is for the fact that I want you to, in some shape or form, in your mind, root against me. And then I want you to be miserable for the first week the album come out. And then I call you again like “What’s up, bro?”  Win, lose, or draw. Because I don’t know what success is, but it’s not in the form of record sales right now. But we’ll find out. Maybe we’ll know what success means when that motherfucker come out.

Culture VI: I hear that. And like I said man, it’s never personal. I can’t root against you, because I don’t root against any artist. Anybody who does hip hop for a living, for a hobby, as a passion, on the side, I root for them to make good music and do what they feel.

Wale: Of course you root for them! Because everyone’s an A&R to the world’s label. And I’ll say this. I have a WHOLE lot of talented people in one room right now and we are trying to find a GAMILLION ways to make another BMF. I’ma holla at you when we done making this record that sounds like EVERYTHING on Self Made so you can tell me I lost my creativity. My publicist keeps calling, telling me this a bad idea. Somebody snitched on me. I want you to keep everything, and do whatever you want with it. I appreciate your time, brother.

About Wil

My goal in life is to win a Dundie Award.

Discussion

24 thoughts on “Wale Interview (part 3): Discusses Self Made, Ambition

  1. Ok, I’m done. I give up. I just got a headache trying to understand ANY point that Wale was trying to make.

    Giving people “records for the summer” doesn’t excuse them from sounding repetitive and lame. Jay did it for how many summers? “Hard Knock Life” didn’t sound like “Izzo”, which didn’t sound like “Change Clothes” which didn’t sound like “Dirt Of My Shoulders”. Saying, “it’s just a record for the summer,” is a huge excuse. Also, you’ll never hear Flex or Envy complain about much because they work in radio. Unless they have a personal beef, you will never hear them “complain” about a record. And what the fuck does, “you MIGHT hear something,” even mean?

    And then the age thing, what was his point in bringing that up? Older people can’t appreciate newer music? And where did you contradict yourself Culture? And……

    Fuck it, I’m out.

    Posted by Justin Vincible | July 19, 2011, 12:03 pm
  2. By the way – he said I “contradicted” myself cus I said I would listen to Maybach Music songs when I’m out, but not in my iPod. So he’s saying how could I have hard the album if I only listen in clubs.

    I thought it was fairly obvious, but of course I listen to the album personally first. My point was – and I thought it was clear, but apparently not – that I listened and didn’t like it. It wasn’t something that I’d add to my personal playlist. But for fun music with no real depth when I’m out, it’s cool.

    Just wanted to clarify.

    Posted by culturevi | July 19, 2011, 1:01 pm
    • Oh ok. To me it was clear that you listened, didn’t like it and now only hear it in clubs or out at a social scene as well. That’s what I didn’t get, his calling out a contradiction that didn’t exist.

      Posted by Justin Vincible | July 19, 2011, 4:12 pm
    • StKaneb real lil b lyrically can’t touch wale lyrically but but @ least he isn’t cocky and he doesn’t change his music every time the haters say something. Wale is only as cool as his co sign. I think people get upset wit any cockiness from him becuz what has he really done other than being featured on a song that went platinum(mind u it wasn’t his song)

      Posted by wack ass wale | July 21, 2011, 1:26 pm
  3. I look forward to seeing Wale being a guest blogger her one day, on how to win friends and to influence people.

    Posted by Bry_jnr | July 19, 2011, 2:23 pm
  4. I got put onto Wale by seeing the video for “Dairy” and I was like this song is hard and I started listening to all his music, downloading every song and mixtape I could find. Wale is one of the most creative artists out, you can hear that shit in Paint a Picture to 100 Miles and Running to Mixtape about Nothing to Attention Deficit to More about Nothing and so on. He spits out real shit and doesn’t care about going mainstream. I thought Attention Deficit was a good album, he had some great songs on there but because Wale wasnt a mainstream artist, the records sales weren’t good but if you really a Wale fan, you cop that shit and loved at least 7 songs on the album and was like wtf is the industry talking about, this is good music.

    I get where people are saying he sold out when he signed to Maybach but you gotta understand, that’s a strategic move on Wale’s part. Maybach is one the hottest labels in music and what better way to get the best producers, writers and music team possible to take your creativity to the next level??? Sign with Maybach Music Group. I have to admit when I first hear “Play your part” or “Pandemonium”, I was like wtf is this?? That shit sounded so mainstream to me but if you really listened to the lyrics of the songs on the Self-Made album, the content is pretty good.

    Posted by Isabella Lubin | July 19, 2011, 2:27 pm
  5. This guy Wale, he’s a hell of a character..I commend him for doing this interview, but I feel like he did it for the wrong reasons…I don’t think he comprehended the questions asked nor did he give an adequate response..Instead he jus talks, doesn’t SAY much jus talks….A good artist non the less, buh that “cocky attitude that he exudes” blinds him from takin constructive criticism(which he probably perceives as hate)…

    Posted by MeekS | July 19, 2011, 3:03 pm
  6. Read the whole interview. My thoughts are as follows…

    He seems to really be worried about what people think of him. How can one inspire their self? Personally, I’m inspired by life. We’re here to misunderstand each other? I think we’re here TO understand and love each other. My whole life has been about that. Lol at him not answering your questions at times.

    Everybody’s story isn’t interesting? I totally disagree! I feel him on the unexplainable goal stuff. Only God knows! Truthfully, I feel like his mixtapes about nothing are better than anything he’s done album, single wise. I really did lol as this comment about Self Made being played in full in the club.

    He talked a lot about everyone being an A&R but he seems to forget that they buy the records…
    And yes, this interview was a bad idea. He let his ego get to him. We shouldn’t worry about what others think about us. I’ll never understand why famous people engage the “haters,” but not their fans.

    I’m 23 and don’t want to listen to his music…
    I think he’s a hit with the high schoolers. I only heard my mentee and kids his age praise him.

    Posted by Danny Tejada | July 19, 2011, 3:34 pm
  7. Wale makes really good music, I don’t think we should or can deny him that. His debut album was quite good – had 14 tracks and outta those, about 8 songs were really good. That makes for more than a mediocre album in my eyes and let’s not talk about his mixtapes. Anyway I digress.

    I really liked this part of the interview the most, he sounded the best out of all three parts on here and he made some valid points on here about all of us being A&Rs and about the Self Made album maybe possibly isn’t the best way to judge or critique his move to MMG, let’s wait for the album

    I personally want him to win

    Posted by Ayodele Adepoju | July 19, 2011, 4:17 pm
  8. Here’s some cut & paste action for you from me (@mrshostile):

    @culturevi, I just read it (once) but I have ADD & he was all over the place, so – you know… Plus, he kept interrupting you with some bullshit, which pisses me off in any situation LOL

    That is all. ¦}

    Posted by DKH»manifest destiny | July 19, 2011, 8:39 pm
  9. I’ve never been a fan. My personal preference. I just don’t think he has presence lyrically or sonically. If he were a good dude, I’d pay more attention. I hated Kanye until I heard “Hey Mama” and realized how fucking human he really is. Kanye has undeniable talent. I’m just struggling to see Wale’s.

    Posted by Flo | July 19, 2011, 9:14 pm
  10. Isn’t Rick Ross like 35 though ….. so he is signed to somebody who doesn’t get music either…. it all makes sense now. I can’t believe dude used the age card like you don’t listen to all types of music. Even in Wale’s raps he has nice delivery but isn’t saying much in most of his songs and he sounds the same on every song. I don’t think he realizes he is just another mediocre rapper right now. Has 900,000 followers but how much does that translate to sales?

    Posted by Mike Vic | July 19, 2011, 11:35 pm
  11. I saw somebody reply on twitter stating they were 23 years old and they didn’t want to listen to Wale’s music. I also am 23, and don’t want to listen to his music. This hasn’t ALWAYS been the case. I was one of those 28,000 who purchased the album. I really enjoyed the track “Contemplate.” The mixtape, Back to the Feature… was awesome! A Mixtape About Nothing, awesome.

    This new stuff with Maybach Music. No thanks.

    Posted by Bardley Beats | July 20, 2011, 12:48 am
  12. Ok. What an idiot. He will never be “successful”. He wont allow himself to be.

    Posted by artoxication | July 20, 2011, 1:05 am
  13. Wale slander? Ive heard it all. Why dont we attack Lil B or one of these people that bring nothing to hiphop as a culture? Instead we berate an artist whom most of us agree is creative, lyrical, and makes good artistic music. This crab in a bucket mentality has to stop somewhere. Why can we not celebrate the fact that a lyrical underground artist has gone to a MMG which is not known for that? In making that move isnt he one step closer to making lyrical hiphop more mainstream and more relevant? Even if every song on Self Made isnt introspective or deep, doesnt he get some credit for raising the bar lyricaly? Nope, lets talk shit about him because he spit on a Lex Luger type beat.

    P.S.
    I first found this interview on hiphopdx.com………that slide show accompanying the interview wasnt biased at all…..(sarcasm)

    Posted by Kane | July 20, 2011, 10:45 am
  14. Culture I’m curious to know what you feel were the downsides to Attention Deficit? I also feel like people directly correlate an artist success based on sales. I think this became more of a thing to compare albums after 50 cent started to point it out while battling artist. But if any person names their top five albums of all time will all of them be the highest selling albums?

    Posted by Dee Cam | July 21, 2011, 6:51 pm
    • i dont care about sales. two of my favorite albums were illmatic (all-time favorite) and food & liquor. neither sold exceptionally well. i just didnt think it was a great album. it was cool, but he talks as if he’s the second coming. if he’s the second coming, his music should back that claim up.

      again, not a bad album. but just cool.

      Posted by culturevi | July 21, 2011, 7:00 pm
  15. My introduction to Wale was an URB Magazine feature piece in late 2007. I liked the story and checked out his music. I wasn’t feeling the music but still gave Wale credit based on the piece So from time to time I would check back to see what he has put out just to see his progression and it is funny to me that since that 2007 story Wale’s music, although I didn’t care for it from the jump, has progressively gotten worse as his “star” shines brighter.

    Another thing that struck me is the difference between that 2007 piece and this interview with you. It is literally like 2 different people. Now I don’t follow Wale on Twitter, obviously I hear some of his music from time to time, but I have never gone out of my way to read any other stories, interviews or any other Wale related journalism because I never felt his music so there was no need to, so I don’t know if it was just dude being a dick or if this was a slow progression but I can’t believe that is the same dude as that 2007 piece.

    Now I am even more concerned about Stalley because I actually like his music and was a little sickened when I heard the news about Ross grabbing him up. My hope is that A: His music doesn’t take a turn for the worse. B: He doesn’t end up with a Wale complex.

    Posted by monsteRmeenA | August 4, 2011, 3:10 am
  16. I’m late to this discussion but I really like Wale’s work (not the new stuff as much but to be honest, i’m still processing the 11-1-11 mixtape). As a fan I was disappointed with Attention Deficit but I also respect his efforts and I realize it is human nature to get defensive at times so he felt the need to defend his music. The album didn’t suck and it was clear Wale can rap is ass off (even if he does sound the same a lot of the time he does it well).

    Mixtape About nothing and Back to the Feature are by far what hooked me as a fan of Wale and recharged my love for engaging music and had me checking for the next generation of hip hop like never before. As a result I have the majority of his catalog and stumbled across scores of new artist that make music with a purpose.

    However, this is where the reality sets in I remember that sports have always served as a good metaphor to life and with Wale’s penance for sports related punchlines I find his current station quite ironic. Wale has most of the tools one needs to be successful in this game and has shown flashes of brilliance (mixtape quality) but now that he is in the pro’s (can we agree Wale is relative in mainstream hip hop) can he translate that potential into success. I prefer quality over quantity so sales mean little to me as detailed so cleverly by Wale in “The Perfect Plan”. Bottom line is can he put together a good album that his core fan base can ride with while bringing in new listeners. Cause he is looking a lot like Reggie Bush or better yet did he also “peak too early like Biakabutuka”.

    The frustrating thing about this interview was Wale seemed to be pressing and very guarded. He came across as naive and borderline immature when he got caught up in age and perceived contradictions. We all have those days so I ain’t trippin on that. In my opinion Wale should remain confident and avoid becoming arrogant. An arrogant person can be cocky and difficult to reason with, making conversation difficult and bothersome. That about summed up this interview from a true fans perspective.

    Posted by Ray | October 1, 2011, 12:32 am
  17. You know what the funniest shit is, none of you got anything from all that knowledged he kicked. Damn shame.. Many of u just don’t like him and when someones mind is made up, there’s little space to reason. The problem is us. Stop comparing & critiquing. your job as the Listener is to LISTEN! u can not have it exactly your way. Artists are not starbucks baristas. songs are not frappuccinos. if u want it exactly your way, book studio time n record yourselves. music is art. u take it as it is, u find beauty in it or don’t… U don’t call out everything YOU find “wrong” with it. Fuck with it or don’t. u see collectors saying Basquiat shoulda made this red instead of green or placed this higher. NO! But we do it. As much as I loved tv and the internet they fucked the music and industry in far worse ways than sales. But it fucked us more cause we’re the ones missing out thinking were Simon cowell n shit.

    Posted by Kellee | November 5, 2011, 7:15 am
  18. You know what the funniest shit is, none of you got anything from all that knowledge he kicked. Damn shame.. Many of u just don’t like him and when someones mind is made up, there’s little space to reason. The problem is us. Stop comparing & critiquing. your job as the Listener is to LISTEN! u can not have it exactly your way. Artists are not starbucks baristas. songs are not frappuccinos. if u want it exactly your way, book studio time n record yourselves. music is art. u take it as it is, u find beauty in it or don’t… U don’t call out everything YOU find “wrong” with it. Fuck with it or don’t. u see collectors saying Basquiat shoulda made this red instead of green or placed this higher. NO! But we do it. As much as I love tv and the internet they fucked music and industry in far worse ways than sales. But it fucked us more we’re the ones missing out thinking were Simon cowell n shit. Enjoyyy it or don’t period.

    Posted by Kellee | November 5, 2011, 7:23 am
  19. “Culture VI: My thing is, I’m listening to some of the Self Made songs, and unless I’m out somewhere, it wasn’t hitting me like that. When that happens, you stop paying attention to the lyrics. Because a song is more than lyrics, it’s the whole package. And that’s what I think that Wale fans are afraid of, that you’re going to lose some of the creativity and—

    Wale: But…according to you, my first album wasn’t GOOD, so it’s not much to lose is my point. You can’t be the same person telling me I made a mediocre first album and telling me I’m going to lose my creativity. Something wasn’t there from the jump! In your eyes. So all it is right now for you to do is get your popcorn, get your seat, get your yellow Nuvo, you know what I’m saying? And sit down and be like “Ambition on the motherfucking way, let’s see what he do”.”

    I think this is pretty much the main thing that Wale has been trying to get across. You’ve got bloggers, fans, etc., that didn’t buy Attention Deficit. You’ve got these same people that thought AD was a mediocre album (there were some bad tracks, but overall, that’s a good album). Yet now, after he sold 28k the first week with AD, these same people come back and are upset that he has a different sound…when Jay-Z did the Kingdom Come thing, a lot of people weren’t feeling it at all. So what did Jay do? He changed his sound up, and we got American Gangster. With Wale, he’s a new artist. I’m a fan of his “Nothing” series, I felt like Back to the Feature was dope, and even The Eleven One Eleven Theory had some “old Wale” tracks that I think are dope. But…he already tried to do an album with some similar sounds, with lyrical records, with records with a message, and it flopped. And not only did it flop, but some critics call it bad, etc. Why would you double down on that approach? That’s pretty much the definition of insanity, lol…

    I can agree with Ross’ sound being ubiquitous, though. You really hear BMF-style songs waaaaaaay too much, to the point that even Ross’ fans have to be getting tired of it. But…until it stops topping charts, until it stops selling, you’re going to hear that. I’m not saying you have to settle for that, but it’s a little two-faced to on one hand call AD mediocre, and then on the other hand say he’s going to lose creativity. Do I think Ambition could’ve been better? Hell yea. I wanted Drums N’ Shit and Lacefrontin’ to be on there, as opposed to Illest Bitch Alive, etc. Do I understand why he did it? Yes. Am I mad? Not really…the album, like you said in your review, is like a 3.5/5, and it’s better than Cole World, IMO. But at the end of the day, if we’re not buying more creative albums, we can’t get upset when we get the Big Sean album or the J Cole album (which was far worse than Friday Night Lights). If the Drake-style stuff is selling, a lot of new artists are going to do similar stuff. And like Wale said in the interview, he’s been doing songs for women, so it’s not a stretch for him to do those songs, it’s just that so many on one album is…ugh. But if college women are the ones buying his records, who’s he going to cater to?

    TL;DR

    If the first album was mediocre, why wouldn’t he change his approach?

    P.S. He’s definitely cocky…but he’s working with Ross, so that’s to be expected. He’s had previous mixtapes be called the mixtape of the year, etc., so his head got blown up a bit. Dude is nice with the pen when he tries, though. And when people are constantly calling you X or Y, you’re going to be defensive. I wouldn’t hold that against him too much. And for the record, I’m 23 and I’ve checked for Wale’s music, whether Paint a Picture or Hate is the New Love, The Mixtape About Nothing, or whatever.

    Posted by Walter George | November 10, 2011, 11:00 pm

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Pingback: Interview: Wale Express Views On Hip Hip - NUE Agency - July 22, 2011

  2. Pingback: Ambition: “I guarantee it’s a classic” -@wale « Culture VI Experience - November 1, 2011

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Watch the Throne: Hip-Hop’s Thriller?

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Follow me on Twitter

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,420 other followers

%d bloggers like this: